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Majalah Ilmiah UNIKOM

Vol.9, No. 2

141

H a l a m a n

change the meaning of the sentence.

who lives in Russia

us in June.

2. Anna will visit us in June.

When we remove the adjective clause

who lives in Russia

whole sentence does not change because

who lives in Russia

an additional that is not necessary for the

sentence.

Since removing the adjective clause

from the sentence does not change the ba-

sic meaning of the sentence, the clause is

considered to be nonessential. Notice that a

nonessential adjective clause is always set

off from the rest of the sentence with com-

mas in writing and by pauses in speaking.

that

nonessential adjective clause (Krohn,

1975 : 187).

4. The introductory words of adjective

clause

An adjective clause may be introduced

by a relative pronoun or by a relative adverb

(Farmer, 1985 : 32). That’s why adjective

clause is also called as relative clause.

a. Relative pronoun is pronoun that join

clause used in adjective clause are to the

rest of a sentence (Manser, 1985 : 348).

who, whom,

whose, whichthat.

relative pronoun can depend on the gen-

der of its antecedent or, especially in

writing, on the kind of adjective clause it

introduces (Farmer, 1985 : 391). Rela-

tive pronoun function to describe or mod-

ify the preceding noun or pronoun

(Ahmadi, 1993 : 52).

i.

Who

Who

function as subject of the sentence

(Farmer, 1985 : 389).

who is my best friend

S

V

marry a lawyer next month

O

The sentence shows that relative

whoGrace

tions as subject.

Who is also used to refer to animals

that are pets or that are called by name

(Farmer, 1985 : 391).

who is calledpussie, loves eat-

ing fish.

who

my cat

subject of the sentence.

Who is always followed by the verb

of the clause.

ii. Whom

Whom

that function as object of the sentence

(Farmer, 1985 : 389).

The subject of the clause will always

whom.

whom she met

S V O

S V

at the cinema

The sentence shows that the pro-

whomthe man

tion as the object of the sentence.

iii. Whose

Whose

object / things that have possessive

meaning (Ridwan, 1995 : 19).

whose fur is black

neighbor’s.

iv. Which

Which

and ideas but not person (Farmer,

1985 : 391).

which I bought last

week,

Which

committeeorchestra,

name groups of people (Farmer, 1985 :

391).

which I saw in the music concert last

week,

whichthat

for using in non essential clauses.

v. That

That

that

which

(Farmer, 1985 : 392).

Asih Prihandini