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Majalah Ilmiah UNIKOM

Vol.9, No. 2

142

H a l a m a n

that rise along the

shores of Loch Ness

fog. (essential clause)

b. Sometimes adjective clause is intro-

duced by the combination of a preposi-

tion and a relative pronoun.

i. in which

in which your clothes

were packed

ii. from whom

from whom you got this

letter

c. Relative adverb is adverb that functions

as conjunction of a sentence (Syah,

1974 : 74). The relative adverb used in

wherewhen.

i. Where

Where

He does not know the hospital

where his wife died.

ii. When

When is used to refer to time.

when people

enjoy their holiday.

5. The form of adjective clause

Two sentences with identical nouns

may be combined to form one sentence with

an adjective clause. The identical noun in

the second sentence (plus any determiners

of modifiers) is replaced by the relative pro-

noun or relative adverb that begins the ad-

jective clause (Farmer, 1985 : 331).

the girl’s

The girl

These sentence can be combined into :

whose wallet is stolen by the

thief

Here are some rules related to the form

of adjective clause :

a. Every sentence containing a noun pre-

ceded by a superlative form of adjective

best, tallest, etc

ever

any time

bestever

be

i. Beform of verb

(watching, buying, etc) or a prepositional

phrase (on the table, in the box, etc)

(Korhn, 1975 : 188).

that is playing

Marianne.

The girl playing the ball is Marianne.

That + be

as…..aslike

188).

that is

Natasia’s.

I want the dress as beautiful as Nata

sia’s.

There is no change in meaning when

thatbe

clause.

That

suffixing

but only a small number of adjective

clause can be changed in this way be-

cause it depends on the verb whether it

suffixing

(Korhn, 1975 : 187).

Peter bought a bicycle that costs $100.

Peter bought a bicycle costing $100.

d. When the verb in the clause is finite of

be

ble

etc), both the relative pronoun and the

finite may be, and usually are omitted

(Hornby, 1975 : 156).

who was visible

policeman

The only person visible was a police-

man.

e. When the verb in the clause is in one of

the progressive tenses, the relative pro-

be

be, and usually are omitted (Hornby,

1975 : 157).

The man (who was) driving the truck

was drunk.

f. The relative pronoun who is also omitted

in colloquial speech after there is / was,

etc and it is / was, etc (Hornby, 1975 :

157).

Asih Prihandini